Students

Young People

A page for students to visit to find career development information. On this page you will find answers to the back page puzzles as well as additional material and activities.

Material is organised by textbook. Select your textbook from the list below:

 


National Career Development Week (NCDW) Videos

This selection of NCDW videos are provided by the CEAV with the permission of the Career Industry Council of Australia.

Eddie McGuire  (mp4 10 MB)

David Wirrpanda  (mp4 175 MB)

Sam Sheppard  (mp4 211 MB)

 

More NCDW Videos:

Inspiring Stories  (mp4 198 MB)

School - What's the Point?  (mp4 94 MB)

Making Smart Subject & Course Choices  (mp4 176 MB)

Parents as Career Coaches  (mp4 137 MB)

Your Career - Make it Happen  (mp4 109 MB)


Discovering Careers - Year 7

Employability Skills Checklist
Download the Employability Skills Checklist

Answers to WOW Words definitions

Career:
All your life, learning and work experiences.

Job: A task that you do which is part of your occupation or career.

Occupation:
Type of work that you do in different ways and places.Industry:A collection of occupations grouped together by a common theme.

Non-Traditional:
In the context of careers and occupations non-traditional means an occupation or job undertaken by a person who is from a group of people not usually associated with that job or occupation.

Stereotype:
General (often individual) characteristics assigned to an entire group of people. Characteristics may be positive or negative.

Discrimination:
In the context of careers and occupations discrimination is when a person is excluded from a career or occupation because of a certain characteristic (stereotyping may lead to discrimination).

Career building:
The process of building one's career through work activities and life experiences.

Skills:
Knowledge and abilities which can be used to perform tasks.

Talents:
The ability to undertake a task. A person can develop talents.

Interests:
Things which you like to do or learn about.

Hobbies:
Activities which you enjoy undertaking.

Employability:
A measure of how successful you will be at obtaining a job.

TAFE:
There are two correct definitions for the acronym TAFE. They are:

  • Technical and Further Education
  • Training and Further Education

TAFE is an institution which offers education after secondary school. The courses offered at TAFE focus more on hands-on learning.

University:
An institution which offers education after secondary school. The courses offered focus more on academic study.

Apprenticeship:
Training undertaken for an occupation while working in that occupation.

Goals:
Targets which you set yourself and work to achieve.

Career Development:
The process of developing your career.


Exploring Careers - Year 8

Download the answers to WOW Words Wordsearch


Focusing on Careers - Year 9

Download the answers to the back page fill-in crossword

Download a pdf version of the answers to the back page fill-in crossword

Errata
The links to videos on the National Career Development Week website are links to the wrong videos. The correct videos may be downloaded from the National Career Development Week section of this page.


Planning My Career - Year 10

Can you help with these FAQ's - Answers

Download a printable version of these answers
 

Q. How do I know I have made the right subject or course choices?
A. You will know you have made the right choices if you feel that you can manage the work or course requirements and you are achieving results that reflect your hard work. While there are no guarantees, if you have thought carefully about your choices and sought some advice then you have done your best to make good decisions.

Q. My parents believe I should only study subjects that give the highest possible score?
A. Ultimately it is you taking the subject and not your parents. All subjects and subject combinations have the potential to give high scores. By studying subjects which you enjoy and are interested in this will motivate you to do well, and by doing well you will achieve the good scores.

Q. My friend left school and went to work at 15. Should I do the same?
A. Before you answer this question be aware that research shows your earning power and employment prospects increase the longer you stay at school. Therefore you should think long and hard about whether or not you should stay at school. You shouldn't do something just because your friend has done it. Ultimately the final decision is up to you.

Q. I have a career in mind but my teacher said that that career is not suitable for me because I am a girl – how can I find out if this correct?
A. Careers options being limited by gender is a very outdated notion that many people and industries are trying to change. Your first point of call should be in checking the careers website of your chosen industry looking for a section on women in the industry. Many non-traditional industries for women have initiatives to try and encourage women into their industry.

Q. I only really like sport subjects so what's the problem with just doing well in this one subject and letting others slide?
A. There are a number of problems with this line of thinking. First is that all subjects contribute to your final score, by doing well in just one subject will not offset doing poorly in all other subjects once your final score is calculated. Second, material you study (particularly in Year 12) may provide the foundation knowledge for your future  studies or work, by not making an effort now you may find that once you start your  course or your job you are missing vital knowledge and will struggle. This is particularly true if the subjects you let slide are prerequisites. Finally, good marks in a single subject and poor marks in all other subjects looks bad on resumes, it shows future employers that you are only interested in putting effort into tasks that you like and may let slide important tasks which you don't like but need to be done. By working consistently across all your subjects will offset all three points mentioned here, and much more.

Q. I really want to explore a number of subject options, there are just too many choices – how do you make a decision about what to study?
A. First, check the prerequisites for the courses you wish to apply for, you will need those prerequisites to get into the courses so they must be part of your selected subjects. Next, fill the remaining places with subjects you enjoy and are interested in. Finally, if you are unsure, make an appointment with your school's career practitioner, they will be able to help you narrow down your subject selections and discuss which options are possible

Q. There seems to be an expectation that you can only succeed if you go to university? Is this true?
A. The short answer: No. The long answer: success is not limited to a university education, it is possible to become very successful via vocational education and training. Many tradespeople become directors of  their own profitable companies.

Q. My teachers keep talking about pathways, but I don't know what this means?
A. Pathways are the combination of subjects, courses, work and other activities which are used to map your career journey from the start to a destination. Pathways are the set of steps needed to achieve a career goal (to reach this career study this course, then move onto this looking for work in this area etc). Pathways are used to show that many career goals can be reached by taking multiple different sequences of steps.

Q. Is work experience really necessary?
A. Yes. It is through work experience that you gain a feel for the world of work and your future workplace. It is strongly encouraged that you choose a work experience placement in an industry which you think you would like to work in, so that you can get a feel for what working in this industry is like and whether you really would like to work in it.

Q. I want to do work experience but don't know where to start?
A. There are two places where you can start. One is to research over the Internet your chosen industry. You will find that many industries offer work experience or taster programs, you can start with applying to some of those. The other option is to talk to your career practitioner, they may have some suggestions on where to start and may have some industry contacts you can use.

World of Work - Don't Panic

Career Profiles sites

Websites in this list showcase careers from a variety of industries. You can use these sites to complete the World of Work activity.

  • Ace Day Jobs: An ABC site which contains a collection of videos of people in a diverse range of jobs explaining what they do and the path they took to get there. The videos on offer range from the well-known general jobs (eg. scientist) to the less well-known.
  • aLife: Provides a set of profiles of people in different careers.
  • MyFuture: A complete career development website that provides the latest information on career choice, skills, fast facts on labour market, jobs growth, job profiles and personal interest inventory.
  • SkillsOne TV: A collection of videos showcasing skills, trades and industries.
  • Youth Central Careers Profiles: A large selection of profiles of young people in varying careers

 

Suggested Occupations

Here is a list of possible occupations which can help solve the problem. You can use this list as a starting point for your research. Be aware that there is no one right occupation for a given task, multiple occupations provide the skills needed to perform a particular task.

  • electronics engineer
  • crowd controller
  • polic officer
  • emergency services operator
  • telecommunications engineer
  • cable technician
  • security guard
  • builder
  • glazier
  • secondary school teacher

Deciding My Career

The shape of jobs to come
Download The shape of jobs to come profiles

Careers in Mining Video
Jenny Sharp - A Change to the 5 Year Plan  (26 MB)

Job Application and Interview Resources
Job search and interview factsheets can be downloaded using the links below. All factsheets are in PDF format.